Zombie Debate: Cats vs. Dogs

It’s the end of the world and the Zombie Apocalypse is in full swing. After a few months hold up in your safe-house with your team members, food supplies are beginning to dwindle. Each time you go out looking for supplies you have to go further and further away from your safe-house and increasingly you find less and less food and water. You have to start doing something or the team is going to starve. Already members are becoming skinnier and skinnier and hunger seems to be driving some if not most to make mistakes. It’s the end of the world and 90% of the population is dead, dying or in most cases walking around dead. No one is left to deliver food to the stores, or even working the stores for that matter. So food is going to have to be grown or you’re going to starve. The most important food that you need right now is… Protein.

So here’s the question. Given the circumstances you are left with few choices but to start farming. The most important need is meat. You need to make a choice. Cattle farming is going to be difficult and take heavy machinery, large plots of land, large amounts of water and work. Not to mention that it takes months for a cow to become the size need to eat, not including gestation. Cannibalism is obviously out of the question… What about… Cats or dogs?

The normal gestation period for cats is between 61 and 69 days depending on the size of breed. In dogs, gestation normally lasts 63 days however, puppies may be delivered between 58 and 68 days. Most cats mature much quicker than dogs and can have kittens within 2 months of being born. For dogs the Italian Greyhounds reach physical maturity between eight months and a year and a half, depending on their bloodline and their size. Dogs of course can reach huge weights and breeds like the Mastiff, for males, the average height range is 30 inches at the shoulder and 27.5 inches for females. Weight varries amoung the dogs from 175-200 pounds. Females normaly weighing less than males. I have seen some males weighing as much as 225 lbs. There are also many cat varieties, Pixie-Bobs are a fully domestic breed of cat bred to resemble the North American Bobcat with males reaching 18 pounds (8 kg) and females reaching 14 pounds (6 kg).

Now I know what you’re saying… “They’re pets, you can’t eat them!”. But cats and dogs are eaten throughout the world. Human consumption of dog meat has been recorded in many parts of the world including China, ancient Mexico, and ancient Rome. Dog meat is currently consumed in a variety of countries such as China, Vietnam, the Philippines, and Korea.In addition, dog meat has also been used as survival food in times of war and/or other hardships. In contemporary times, some cultures view the consumption of dog meat to be a part of their traditional cuisine, while others consider consumption of dog to be offensive. Supporters of dog meat argue that the distinction between livestock and pets is subjective.

Cats are eaten in certain rural Swiss cultures; the traditional recipe on farms in some regions involved cooking the cat with sprigs of thyme. In January 2004, Reuters reported that, “Swiss culinary traditions include puppies and kittens. Private consumption of cat and dog is permissible. Swiss animal welfare groups say it is hard to estimate how many pets are eaten in Switzerland every year. Researchers have found recipies for “Cat stew” and “cat in sauce” in the Basque County in the Spanish province of Alava. Cats were sometimes eaten as a famine food during bad winters, poor harvests, and—most especially—during wartime. Cat gained notoriety as “roof rabbit” in Central Europe’s hard times during and between World War I and World War II.

This recipe for “Roast Cat as It Should Be Prepared” is from Ruperto de Nola, Libro de Cozina, 1529: Take a cat that should be plump: and cut its throat, and once it is dead cut off its head, and throw it away for this is not to be eaten; for it is said that he who eats the brains will lose his own sense and judgement. Then skin it very cleanly, and open it and clean it well; and then wrap it in a clean linen cloth and bury it in the earth where it should remain for a day and a night; then take it out and put it on a spit; and roast it over the fire, and when beginning to roast, baste it with good garlic and oil, and when you are finished basting it, beat it well with a green branch; and this should be done until it is well roasted, basting and beating; and when it is roasted carve it as if it were rabbit or kid and put it on a large plate; and take the garlic with oil mixed with good broth so that it is coarse, and pour it over the cat and you can eat it for it is a good dish.

How about nutrition. Well 100 grams of raw dog meat contains 60.1 percent water, 19 grams of protein, 20.2 grams of fat and 44.4 milligrams of cholesterol. It also contains vitamins, potassium, ash, phosphorous, iron and sodium. Compared to other meats or ingredients, dog meat has less cholesterol. There are 1,280 milligrams of cholesterol in an egg yolk, 82.4 in tuna and 65.2 in pork. Compared to beef, pork and chicken, dog meat is not high in protein. But it is true that its amino acid content is superior to other meats. I haven’t been able to find anything with the nutritional value of cat meat and if you know where I can get this please put a link in the comments below.

So do you have it in you to eat Rex or Fluffy? We’re not too sure we are. But given that we are survivors… we will of course survive by any means necessary. Personally I don’t want to eat dogs, but I will use them to herd cats. As always… Leave your opinion below.

http://www.messybeast.com/eat-cats.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat_meat
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog_meat

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